"Defendendo a Independencia de Timor-Leste"

"Defendendo a Independencia de Timor-Leste"

quinta-feira, 6 de setembro de 2007

The unconstitutional, irrational and damaging decision by President Jose - A legal opinion on the formation of an unconstitutional government

The unconstitutional, irrational and damaging decision by President Jose
Ramos Horta

A legal opinion on the formation of an unconstitutional government


By Sahe Da Silva and José Teixeira

This opinion builds on an earlier opinion "Legal opinion on the
appointment of the Prime Minister and the formation of the Government in
Timor-Leste" [1] published by the East Timor Law Journal on 11 July 2007.
It examines the unconstitutional decision of President Jose Ramos Horta to
invite the second most voted party to form government (as opposed to the
most voted party).

Set out below is our analysis of President Ramos Horta's decision:

1. The decision to invite the second most voted party to form
government is unconstitutional. As stated in the previous opinion, the
mandate to form government is given to the party or a pre-election
alliance which receives the most votes in the parliamentary elections
(please see previous opinion for our analysis on this point). This is
because the electorate votes for the policies and programs of a political
party or a distinct and separate alliance. In the last election there
were only two distinct and separate alliances, that of PSD/ASDT and
KOTA/PPT.

FRETILIN, as the most voted party, should have been invited first to
form government and be given the opportunity to negotiate the passing of
its program[2].

2. It is common practice in other countries which have similar
systems to Timor-Leste to first invite the most voted party to form
government and negotiate the passing of its programme. Commentators who
argue that what has happened in Timor-Leste in relation to the formation
of the new government is standard practice around the world have not
acknowledged that certain steps must first be taken before the second most
voted party is invited to form government.

3. Under the Constitution of Timor-Leste (which is different to
Australia's) the real test of strength of any government is whether it can
pass its programme for national development through Parliament. This
requires an absolute majority of the members of Parliament in full
exercise of their functions[3].

The government is dismissed if its programme is rejected two consecutive
times[4].

4. Post election coalitions are only relevant to controlling
Parliament, the supreme law making body and the most powerful institution
under the Timor-Leste Constitution.

5. The second most voted party can form government, but only in
certain situations relating to the failure of the most voted party to pass
its programme for national development through parliament.

The first situation where the second most voted party may be invited to
form government is after the most voted party's programme has been
rejected twice and the government has been subsequently dismissed. When
this happens there is a power vacuum because there is no specific
provision in the constitution to invite the second most voted party to
form government. A power vacuum will lead to the breakdown of national
unity and threaten the smooth functioning of democratic institutions. To
address the power vacuum, the President as the 'guarantor of national
independence and unity of the State and of the smooth functioning of
democratic institutions'[5] can invite the second most voted party to form
government and attempt to pass its programme through National Parliament.

The second situation where the second most voted party may be invited to
form government is where the most voted party decides it does not have the
support in parliament to pass its programme and requests the President to
invite the second most voted party to form government. However, this can
only occur once the most voted party has at least been invited to form
government and is given the opportunity to negotiate the passing of its
programme with the other political parties with seats in Parliament.

6. There is no legal basis for President Jose Ramos Horta to use the
election of the President of Parliament to decide which party should be
invited to form government. This is because the election for President of
Parliament (a person) is starkly different to that of a programme for
national development, which as we stated above, is the real test of the
strength of government. One can also question President Ramos Horta's
use of the election for President of Parliament as the basis for his
decision given the vote was secret (ie it is impossible to confirm how the
members of parliament actually voted).

7. President Jose Ramos Horta's decision is damaging to democracy.
By inviting the second most voted party to form government, he never gave
FRETILIN, the most voted party, the opportunity and space to negotiate the
passing of the programme. The President's decision ignores the
expectations of 120,000 people who voted for FRETILIN. The decision is
also damaging to democracy because it is unconstitutional.

In addition, by not inviting the most voted party to form government
President Jose Ramos Horta has set an unacceptable precedent. In the
future, it could mean that the most voted party (or pre-election
alliance) which has won 40% of the vote may not be able to form government
if the remaining 60% of minor parties (and/or pre-election alliances)
announce an informal post election coalition immediately as was the case
after the 30 June 2007 parliamentary elections.

It is important to acknowledge that the most voted party won the
elections, that it be asked to form government and that it be given the
time and space to negotiate the passing of the programme.

8. President Ramos Horta's decision is also irrational. If President
Ramos Horta and FRETILIN both agreed on the need to form an inclusive
government, then one has to seriously question the President's decision to
invite the second most voted party to form government.

9. The coalition between CNRT and its allies was not a coalition
registered to compete in the parliamentary elections, but a loose grouping
which was brought together in the days after the election results were
announced. Despite arguing that they were a coalition within the meaning
of article 106, at the first opportunity in parliament CNRT and its allies
did not register in the Parliament as a grouping, that is as a "bancada"
(or bench).

Had CNRT and its allies been a coalition or an alliance one would have
thought that they would have registered as a 'bancada'. Instead, CNRT and
its allies (including each of PSD and ASDT which had formed a distinct and
separate pre-election alliance) registered as individual parties with
individual heads of each party in Parliament. This was presumably done to
ensure that the leaders of each party got the distinct privileges that
attach to being a leader of an individual party and the benefits that flow
from having that status. By taking this approach CNRT and its allies have
failed their own substantive test which formed the basis of their argument
to be invited first to form government ie they demonstrated that they were
not really a "coalition" or "alliance" in the meaning of the word.

10. The unconstitutionality of President Ramos Horta’s decision is based
on a legal interpretation of the Constitution, which ideally should be
tested in the Court of Appeal, currently the highest court of law in
Timor-Leste. However, the Court of Appeal should not be asked to hand
down a decision on this matter because the current impasse is essential a
political problem, not a legal one. In Timor-Leste's emerging democracy
it is important that the judiciary be developed as an independent legal
institution and not be put under extreme political pressure.

Also, our political leaders must be responsible for the consequences of
their decisions in relation to the formation of the unconstitutional
government and not transfer responsibility to the Court of Appeal.



Sahe Da Silva

Bachelor of Law (Honours) and Bachelor of Business (Accounting) from the
University of Technology, Sydney

José Teixeira

Bachelor of Law from the University of Queensland (St. Lucia)
________________________________



[1]
http://www.eastimorlawjournal.org/ARTICLES/2007etlj4appointmentofprimeministerformationofgovernment.html


[2] Article 106 of the Constitution


[3] Articles 108 and 109 of the Constitution


[4] Articles 86(g) and section 112


[5] Article 74 of the Constitution

2 comentários:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
A decisão inconstitucional, irracional e prejudicial do Presidente José Ramos Horta – Uma opinião legal sobre a formação de um governo inconstitucional

Por Sahe Da Silva e José Teixeira

Esta opinião é construída sobre a opinião anterior "Opinião legal sobre a nomeação do Primeiro-Ministro e a formação do Governo em Timor-Leste" [1] publicado pelo Jornal da Lei de Timor-Leste em 11 Julho 2007.
Examine a decisão inconstitucional do Presidente José Ramos Horta para convidar o segundo partido mais votado a formar governo (em oposição ao partido mais votado).

Em baixo está a nossa análise da decisão do Presidente Ramos Horta:

1. A decisão de convidar o segundo partido mais votado a formar
governo é inconstitucional. Conforme afirmado na opinião anterior, o
mandato para formar governo é dado ao partido ou aliança pré-eleitoral que receber o maior número de votos nas eleições parlamentares
(por favor veja a nossa opinião anterior para a nossa análise neste ponto). Isto é assim porque o eleitorado vota pelas políticas e programas de um partido político ou de uma distinguível e separada aliança. Nas últimas eleições houve apenas duas alianças distinguíveis e separadas, a do PSD/ASDT e a do KOTA/PPT.

A FRETILIN, sendo o partido mais votado, devia ter sido o primeiro a ser convidado para formar governo e a ser dado a oportunidade para negociar a aprovação do seu programa[2].

2. É prática comum noutros países que têm sistemas similares com o de Timor-Leste convidar primeiro o partido mais votado para formar o
governo e negociar a aprovação do seu programa. Comentadores que
argumentam que o que aconteceu em Timor-Leste em relação à formação do novo governo é uma prática padrão à volta do mundo não reconheceram que certos passos devem ser primeiro dados antes de se convidar o segundo partido mais votado para formar governo.

3. Sob a Constituição de Timor-Leste (que é diferente da da Austrália) o verdadeiro teste de força de qualquer governo é se consegue aprovar o seu programa para o desenvolvimento nacional no Parlamento. Isto
requer uma maioria absoluta dos membros do Parlamento no exercício pleno das suas funções[3].

O governo é demitido se o seu programa for rejeitado duas vezes consecutivas[4].

4. As coligações pós-eleições são apenas relevantes para controlar o
Parlamento, o órgão supremo para a feitura de leis e a instituição mais poderosa na Constituição de Timor-Leste.

5. O segundo partido mais votado pode formar governo, mas apenas em certas situações relacionadas com o falhanço do partido mais votado em aprovar o seu programa para o desenvolvimento nacional no Parlamento.

A primeira situação onde o segundo partido mais votado pode ser convidado para formar governo é depois de o programa do partido mais votado ter sido rejeitado duas vezes e subsequentemente o governo ter sido demitido. Quando isso acontece há um vácuo de poder porque não há nenhuma provisão específica na constituição para convidar o segundo partido mais votado para formar governo. Um vácuo de poder levaria a um colapso da unidade nacional e ameaçaria o funcionamento normal das instituições democráticas. Para responder a esse vácuo de poder, o Presidente sendo o 'garante da independência nacional e da unidade do Estado e do funcionamento normal das instituições democráticas'[5] pode convidar o segundo partido mais votado a formar governo e tentar aprovar o seu programa no Parlamento Nacional.

A segunda situação onde o segundo partido mais votado pode ser convidado para formar governo é onde o primeiro partido mais votado decide que não tem apoio no parlamento para aprovar o seu programa e pede ao Presidente para convidar o segundo partido mais votado para formar governo. Contudo, isto pode apenas ocorrer depois do primeiro partido mais votado ter sido pelo menos convidado para formar
governo e ter-lhe sido dada a oportunidade de negociar a aprovação do seu programa com os outros partidos políticos com lugares no Parlamento.

6. Não há nenhuma base legal para o Presidente José Ramos Horta usar a eleição do Presidente do Parlamento para decidir qual o partido deve ser convidado para formar governo. É assim porque a eleição para o Presidente do Parlamento (uma pessoa) é totalmente diferente da de um programa para o desenvolvimento nacional, que conforme afirmámos em cima, é o teste verdadeiro da força do governo. Pode-se também questionar o uso pelo Presidente Ramos Horta da eleição do Presidente do Parlamento como base para esta sua decisão dado que o voto foi secreto (i.e. é impossível confirmar como actualmente votaram os membros do parlamento).

7. A decisão do Presidente José Ramos Horta causa prejuízos à democracia.
Ao convidar o segundo partido mais votado a formar governo, nunca deu à FRETILIN, o partido mais votado, a oportunidade e o espaço para negociar a aprovação do programa. A decisão do Presidente ignora as expectativas de 120,000 pessoas que votaram na FRETILIN. A decisão é ainda prejudicial para a democracia porque é inconstitucional.

Em acréscimo, ao não convidar o partido mais votado a formar governo o Presidente José Ramos Horta marcou um precedente inaceitável. No
futuro, isso pode significar que o partido mais votado (ou aliança pré-eleitoral) que tenha conquistado 40% dos votos pode não conseguir formar governo se os remanescentes 60% dos partidos mais pequenos (e/ou alianças pré-eleitorais) anunciarem imediatamente uma coligação informal pós-eleitoral como foi o caso depois das eleições parlamentares de 30 de Junho de 2007.

É importante reconhecer que o partido mais votado ganhou as eleições, que ele seja convidado a formar governo e que lhe seja dado o tempo e espaço para negociar a aprovação do programa.

8. A decisão do Presidente Ramos Horta é ainda irracional. Se o Presidente
Ramos Horta e a FRETILIN ambos concordaram na necessidade de formar um governo inclusivo, então temos que questionar seriamente da decisão do Presidente de convidar o segundo partido mais votado para formar governo.

9. A coligação entre o CNRT e os seus aliados não foi uma coligação registada para disputar as eleições parlamentares, mas um agrupamento informal que se juntou nos dias depois dos resultados das eleições terem sido anunciados. Apesar de argumentarem que eram uma coligação dentro do significado do artigo 106, na primeira oportunidade no parlamento o CNRT e os seus aliados não se registaram no Parlamento como um agrupamento, isto é, como uma "bancada".

Fossem o CNRT e os seus aliados uma coligação ou uma aliança podia-se pensar que se registariam como uma 'bancada'. Em vez disso, o CNRT e os seus aliados (incluindo o PSD e ASDT que tinham formado uma distinguível e separada aliança pré-eleitoral) registaram-se como partidos individuais com chefes individuais de cada partido no Parlamento. Presume-se que isto foi feito para assegurar que os líderes de cada partido obtenham os privilégios distintos ligados à liderança de um partido individual e aos benefícios que derivam de tal estatuto. Ao seguirem esta abordagem o CNRT e os seus aliados falharam o seu próprio teste substantivo que esteve na base do seu argumento para ser convidado a formar governo i.e. demonstraram que não eram realmente uma "coligação" ou "aliança" no verdadeiro sentido da palavra.

10. A inconstitucionalidade da decisão do Presidente Ramos Horta está baseada numa interpretação legal da Constituição, que idealmente deveria ser testada no Tribunal de Recurso, correntemente a mais alta instância legal em Timor-Leste. Contudo, não deve ser pedido ao Tribunal de Recurso que tome uma decisão sobre esta matéria porque o impasse corrente é essencialmente um problema político, não um problema legal. Na democracia emergente de Timor-Leste é importante que o sistema judicial se desenvolva como instituição legal independente e não seja posta sob pressão política extrema.

Também, os nossos líderes políticos devem ser responsabilizados pelas consequências das suas decisões em relação com a formação do governo inconstitucional e não transferirem a responsabilidade para o Tribunal de Recurso.



Sahe Da Silva

Bacharel de Lei (Honra) e Bacharel de Comércio (Contabilidade) pela
Universidade de Tecnologia, Sydney

José Teixeira

Bacharel de Lei pela Universidade de Queensland (St. Lucia)
________________________________



[1]
http://www.eastimorlawjournal.org/ARTICLES/2007etlj4appointmentofprimeministerformationofgovernment.html


[2] Artigo 106 da Constituição


[3] Artigos 108 e 109 da Constituição


[4] Artigos 86(g) e secção 112


[5] Artigo 74 da Constituição

Maubere disse...

As an East-Timorese I'm really disappointed with the decision made by the president which clearly unconstitutional. If we keep on allowing this behavior of a president who is clearly violate the constitution, i believe our country will just allowed next generation of him and xanana to grow more and more. We all know how Ramos Horta has shown his capabilities in the debate made before he elected as president. IF we could not count on him as a president who respect the constitution then we better ask him to step down cause in the future of his term, unconstitutional decision will be made lots more and the country will lost its sovereignty as it has showing now, and before, decision made by then Xanana to ask for ex PM to stepped down.....
My point is that, better ask ramos horta to step down if he's afraid of loosing his position by made unconstitutional decision which lead to more and more people suffer because of it now than let him there with no hope that he will one day respect it....we can not rely on someone who can not be trusted as ramos horta to be a president of a democratic country....I acknowledge that if he steps down then fernando will be the president, however, it's one step forward to show people that it is the consequences of not respecting the constitution....it will scare the next generation though the next generation of him and xanana is growing but we must work hard and fights for what we believe to be the best for the country and its people in the future. It is better to act now than later..

it's just an opinion and
i acknowledge that it's not as simple as what i've said but we must also think of the future consequences if we let this situation happened.

Thx